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NEW JOBS FOR MAINE PEOPLE START WITH THOSE AT STATE GOVERNMENT.

OUTSOURCING HAS YET TO BE PROVEN AS A LESS EXPENSIVE ALTERNATIVE TO HIRING OUR OWN

Presently, and in the past, the state has contracted with out of state welfare consulting, transportation, and computer services companies oftentimes winding up costing hundreds of thousands of Maine taxpayers dollars paid for poor or non-existent service. For example, the Anderson Group was paid a half a million dollars even after the firm was fired for plagiarism.  The contract was never completed and there was no effort to recoup the fees paid.  An out-of-state Connecticut transportation services firm was hired to transport elderly, disabled, and sick Mainers to doctor’s appointment but the latter were left, too often, at curbside waiting for a ride that never arrived.

My platform would include training and investment in giving priority to Maine companies who could provide equal or better services at the reduced cost and added income to our state.

JOBS IN CONSTRUCTION OF CLEAN WATER RETROFITS AND CLEAN RESIDENTIAL, PRIVATE AND PUBLIC DRINKING WELLS AND PIPE LINES

Maine has the highest liver cancer death rate in New England.

While it is not clear whether there is a connection between the heavy polluted wells in the drinking water, I would push for measure to mitigate our water pollution problem.

The new jobs would come from exploring, drilling for new wells, treating with residential filtration systems, and pumping of lake water, building water pipelines from clean water aquifers to areas to polluted wells would create many new jobs and cut home owners costs for bottled water while avoiding costly medical care.

These projects would be paid for by significantly increase the taxes on the 172 million gallons of bottled waters being exported out of state by the Nestles' company along with small or no interest loans to municipalities, businesses, and residences. 

JOBS IN HOME HEALTH CARE TO AVOID COSTLY INSTITUTIONAL CARE FOR THE ELDERLY/DISABLED

Maine holds the record for the second largest percentage of elderly yet offers little by the way of alternatives to institutional care such as home skilled and unskilled care.  Maine has a shortage of nurses, home health workers, and elderly housing which potentially could offer an abundance of new, good-paying jobs while broadening the income tax base and avoiding more costly institutional costs.

Expansion of federal Medicaid funding, state guaranteed loans for accredited, physician directed  homemaker/home health aide/nursing services licensed and accredited to perform light housekeeping, shopping, referral,  personal hygiene, meds and blood pressure monitoring, skilled nursing, occupational therapy, and nutrition services in the home. The bulk of these services would be the light housekeeping services provided by homemakers who would go to the home for two hours perhaps four times a week where the cost of services at an estimated average of $1000/month to keep elderly people at home and avoid malnutrition, falls, over or under medicating, and the loss of wages of family caregivers. 

By comparison, some average costs for long-term care in the United States (in 2010) were: $205 per day or $6,235 per month for a semi-private room in a nursing home. $229 per day or $6,965 per month for a private room in a nursing home. $3,293 per month for care in an assisted living facility (for a one-bedroom unit).  The cost of one day in the emergency room or hospital care that could have been avoided would be much, much higher on a per day basis.

JOBS IN COMMUNITY-BASED, NON-PROFIT, DIRECT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINICS

To lower the cost of hospital and physician care while providing new jobs, I would ask the legislature to fund a physician’s assistant and advanced practice registered nurse program, tuition free, in return for five years’ of service in community clinics connected electronically to general practitioners, specialists, and major hospitals which would provide new jobs while treating minor injuries such as cuts, bruises, and illnesses which would otherwise require transport by ambulance in rural areas to costly emergency rooms.  The community health programs would be funded through sliding scale fees from patients, Medicare, Medicaid, and insurance companies.

Non-profit, community-based drug treatment facilities with solid, measurable outcomes could be funded by some of the above sources as well as contributions from higher income residents in need of meeting the new standard deduction level by donating to charity.

JOBS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF ELDERLY AND LOW INCOME HOUSE THROUGH FEDERAL HUD FUNDING.

JOBS IN EDUCATION

“Give me a child until he is 7 and I will show you the man.” is quote from Aristotle used by many prominent people throughout history to emphasize the importance of learning during the first seven years of life.  

I see investment in education as an investment into the stability and prosperity of Maine.

Most psychologists adhere to that principle emphasizing the need for a basic education and good parenting from preschool through high school.   Kids who live in an environment of food insecurity or family dysfunctions too often test out as being mentally retarded and don't aspire to the same level as kids who come from less impoverished home settings. 

A kid who gets deemed MR requires smaller teacher to student ratios and cost more to educate.

What is frightening is a recent newspaper article suggest that only 36 percent of Maine fourth-graders are proficient in reading. 

I don't agree with the current administrations plan to cut state funding for schools.

Rather than cut funding to town and city schools and dilute existing funding and redirecting those funds to private or charter schools, my platform would be to not divert that money, and to hire more teachers to optimize teacher student ratios.

To fund more teachers, I am in agreement with the existing administration in cutting the number of school administrators to sixteen representing each county.

In addition, I would seek to private grant support for special needs programs.

To fill the need for skilled workers and assist high school students fund college or trade school, I would ask the legislature to approve funding for information technology and trade school curriculum for high school students whether or not to decide to further their educations in trades or college.  For example, a high school graduate with a certificate in welding, oil burner repair, carpentry or other trades could earn a lot more money part-time or during school breaks than working at the local MacDonald's.

The expense for state bureaucratic administration is costing hundreds of thousands of dollars to foreigners and out of state vendors to perform computer and networks services.  I have no doubt we could train our own students to perform that work, pay them well, and keep them from being forced to leave the state.

To keep our graduates and contribute to our economy, we could offer the students free tuition in return for five years of service working in Maine.

JOBS IN HEMP FARMING AND MANUFACTURING

State should invest in or make available state guaranteed loans to promote hemp farming, processing and manufacturing jobs associated with it. 

Not a moment too soon. American farmers have been watching as Canadian farmers clear huge profits from hemp: $250 per acre in 2013. By comparison, South Dakota State University predicts that soy, a major crop, will net U.S. farmers $71 per acre in 2014.

Hemp takes half the water that wheat does, and provides four times the income. Hemp is going to revive farming families in the climate change era.— Colorado farmer Ryan Loflin

Canada's windfall has been largely due to the American demand for omega-balanced hemp seed oil. But hemp is also a go-to material for dozens of applications all over the world. In a Dutch factory recently, I held the stronger-than-steel hemp fiber that's used in Mercedes door panels, outlet.  Hemp products:  https://www.google.com/#q=hemp+products

Last year, Maine legalized hemp but nothing has been done to invest in the industry.

JOBS IN BUILDING ROAD AND BRIDGE INFRASTRUTURE

The 2016 Report Card on Maine’s Infrastructure gave the state an overall grade of C-. Maine ASCE analyzed the following fundamental components of each infrastructure area: Existing Conditions, Capacity, Operations & Maintenance, Innovation & Resiliency, Public Safety, and Funding/Investment needs. Of the 14 categories, only two infrastructure categories are in good condition (B-), eight categories ranged in the fair to mediocre range (C+, C or C-), and four categories were considered to be in poor condition (D+ or D). Of more concern are the 8 areas that are showing a decline. The good news is there are solutions to all these challenges, and we can raise Maine’s infrastructure grades. http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/maine/maine-overview/

Investment in road, bridge rail, and ferry improvement is a good investment because only 42 percent of the cost comes out of state tax dollars.  Such constructions provides a source of jobs throughout the state. http://www.maine.gov/mdot/projects/workplan/docs/2015/WorkPlan2015-2016-2017.pdf

JOBS TO RETROFIT PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND NEW CONTRUCTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT AND RENEWABLES.

The current administration claims Maine is losing jobs because of high energy prices but is against the development of jobs associated with solar projects which offer good paying jobs in other states and countries.

·  Solar jobs in the United States have increased at least 20 percent per year for the past four years, and jobs have nearly tripled since the first Solar Jobs Census was released in 2010.

·  Over the next 12 months, employers surveyed expect to see total solar industry employment increase by 10 percent to 286,335 solar workers.

·  In 2016, the five states with the most solar jobs were California, Massachusetts, Texas, Nevada, and Florida.

http://www.thesolarfoundation.org/national/

http://www.jobs-to-careers.com/results3.php?q=Solar+Energy&l=Augusta%2C+ME

I would offer tax incentives for home owners and builders to take advantage of passive and active solar heating and cooling construction which adds little to new construction costs.   Conduct state seminars on the cost benefit of deploying active and passive solar heat strategies.

http://www.alternative-energy-news.info/passive-solar-energy/

As other states and countries continue to benefit from solar energy generation, the governor of the State of Maine has invested little in resolving its high energy costs as out of state, proprietary companies continue to build wind mills that dot the landscape in Blue Hill and Island Pond.  Ironically the electricity that is generated is transmitted out of state with little benefit to the surrounding towns.

A new solar farm in Fairfield will also provide out of state transmission as electricity prices for Maine continue to rise. 

Worse yet, the governor continues to attack renewable energy and instead advocates for off-shore oil drilling.  In addition climate change deniers in the state legislature and out-of-state polluters bankrolling them has left Maine far behind in the development of clean energy.

If I were elected, I would do everything in my power to invest in renewables through loan guarantees or tax credits to home owners and small business owners who invest in renewables, while preventing out-of-state and out-of-country energy companies from establishing power monopolies like CMP owned by French investors.  Investing in renewables would create jobs and help save our planet.

JOBS IN TOURISM

In the country of China, tourism represents the third largest industry.  Maine has many beautiful venues tourists are already enjoying.  Look at states like California, the state has expanded its tourist and forestry departments to offer fee-for-service tours which take tourists to different venues in the state.  This benefits not only state government to cover the expenses of the tours but to all the local businesses on the way who, in turn, also pay taxes.

I could envision an organized bus tour starting in Portland to a half day in Old Orchard Beach, lunch and a beer at Run of the Mill pub in Biddeford, followed by a tour of Two Lights State Park, Fort Williams, shopping in Portland, followed by a lobster dinner at Dimillo's in Portland. Next day there could be a tour of LL Bean and small coastal towns like Rockland and Boothbay Harbor.  Other tour would be fall foliage and/or winter ones featuring skiing, snowmobiling in Rangely or further north, the Snow Bowl International Toboggan Championships in Camden.

These are all examples of state-operated tourist venues, either provided through the state forest service or subcontracted to Maine small business while generating state and private revenues.

JOBS TO ADDRESS MAINE'S DRUG EPIDEMIC

Heroin and other opioids have a grip on Maine, killing a person a day and growing. What's the solution? A joint effort of parents, teachers, law enforcement, former addicts, health care providers, and legislators to implement a comprehensive plan of community-based services to replace expensive incarceration and incarceration recidivism as the primary treatment modality.

Here would be some of my suggestions to release that grip: 

1. Reduce demand by hiring more teachers to develop and implement drug education K through 12.

2. Reduce demand by enlisting the cooperation of physicians to prescribe, where feasible, alternatives to drug prescription to relieve pain such phyiscal therapy and exercise.

3.  Create construction jobs to develop acres of vacant land and buildings at Riverview mental hospital for a central state of the art detox center, drug treatment, and counselling center

4. Invest in community-based residential transitional facilities with vocation rehabilitation and job placement services

5. Provide 12 to 36 month followups

6. Release from jail and place on probation/work release prisoners who pose no threat to society.

7. Try and sentence drug peddlers as conspirators to commit mass murder thus making Maine the riskiest place on the planet to peddle drugs.

The cost of the program would be by restoring estate taxes to 1985 levels, savings from reducing or cutting non-cost effective programs such as welfare fraud inspectors, restoring the 51 million lost in federal funding at Riverview, savings from auditing all outsourced and in-state contracts, increased state gas tax as more fuel efficient cars come on the market, and the sale or leasing out of unused state property.

 


Committee to Elect Patrick "Ike" Eisenhart
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